Article: What the Supreme Court’s gerrymandering decision means for 2020

Election 2020, Election Reform

What the Supreme Court’s gerrymandering decision means for 2020

The Supreme Court’s ruling Thursday that federal courts cannot determine whether election maps are too partisan has raised the stakes for the 2020 election, leaving room for both parties to draw gerrymandered district lines with little fear of a high court legal challenge.

Critics had hoped that the Supreme Court would deal a blow to the system. But in its 5-4 ruling, the court found that the power to address partisan gerrymandering lies with Congress, not the courts.

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Article: US Supreme Court blocks census citizenship question for now

Election Reform

US Supreme Court blocks census citizenship question for now

The US Supreme Court has blocked the Trump administration from adding a question on citizenship to the 2020 census for the time being.

The White House has argued that the question will bolster protections for minority voters.

But opponents say it could deter immigrant households from taking part because of fears that data could be shared with law enforcement agencies.

President Trump responded by saying he would try to delay the census.

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Article: What Is Gerrymandering? And How Does it Work?

Election Reform, Gerrymandering

What Is Gerrymandering? And How Does it Work?

Here’s what you need to know about the legal battle over the rigging of district maps to entrench a governing party’s political power.

The Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that the federal courts cannot decide a question with momentous political consequences: Whether congressional district maps in Maryland and North Carolina that were drawn specifically to tilt political power in favor of one party — a practice known as partisan gerrymandering — are acceptable.

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Article: The fight over the 2020 census citizenship question, explained

Election Reform

The fight over the 2020 census citizenship question, explained

The latest face-off between House Democrats and President Donald Trump is over the proposed citizenship question on the 2020 census.

The House Oversight Committee voted Wednesday to recommend holding Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Attorney General William Barr in contempt of Congress for refusing to comply with subpoenas in the committee’s investigation into how and why the question was added.

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Article: Report: Voter Rolls Are Growing Owing To Automatic Voter Registration

Election Reform

Report: Voter Rolls Are Growing Owing To Automatic Voter Registration

The United States is almost alone among industrial countries and other democracies in putting most of the onus of registering to vote on individual voters, a sometimes cumbersome process that may explain a large portion of why turnout rates in the U.S. are lower than in many other countries.

But the increasing adoption of automatic voter registration over the past five years has led to a big boost in the voter rolls in states that have implemented the new system, according to a new study by the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University Law School.

Article: Tell Me More: Why Minority Voting Turnout Matters

Election Reform

Tell Me More: Why Minority Voting Turnout Matters

Tell Me More is a Tufts University podcast featuring brief conversations with the thinkers, artists, makers, and shapers of our world. Listen and learn something new every episode. Subscribe on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play MusicSpotifyStitcher, and SoundCloud.

As America gets closer to the 2020 presidential election, everyone wants to know, “Who will run?” But there’s another important question to ask: “Who will turn out to vote?” There’s a gap in voter turnout between white people and people of color—a gap that has an impact on election outcomes and on our democracy. So where does this turnout gap come from? Who votes, who doesn’t vote, and why?

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Article: Some Noncitizens Do Wind Up Registered To Vote, But Usually Not On Purpose

Election Reform

Some Noncitizens Do Wind Up Registered To Vote, But Usually Not On Purpose

About five years ago, immigration attorneys started contacting Pennsylvania election officials to report that many of their clients had gone to get a driver’s license and, a few weeks later, received a voter registration card in the mail.

Sundrop Carter, executive director of the Pennsylvania Immigration and Citizenship Coalition, says it was especially disturbing for immigrants who were trying to become citizens.

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Article: About the Presidential Election Campaign Fund

Election Reform

About the Presidential Election Campaign Fund

The Presidential Election Campaign Fund is a government-run program whose mission is to help candidates for the highest elected office in the United States pay for their campaigns.

The Presidential Election Campaign Fund is financed by taxpayers who voluntarily contribute $3 of their federal taxes to publicly financing presidential campaigns. Donors to the fund contribute by checking the “yes” box on their U.S. income tax return forms in answer to the question: “Do you want $3 of your federal tax to go to the Presidential Election Campaign Fund?”

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Article: How the 2020 census will boost the South’s political clout

Election Reform

How the 2020 census will boost the South’s political clout

As the embattled U.S. Census Bureau ramps up operations for the decennial population count, including opening more than 240 field offices and recruiting thousands of field staff, recent data reveals the political importance of an accurate count in 2020, especially for Southern states.

Thanks to fast-growing populations in Florida, North Carolina and Texas, Southern states are projected to add six congressional seats and Electoral College votes after the 2020 census count, according to estimates released in December by Election Data Services and Polidata.

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Article: Why 2020 US Presidential Race Will Be Costliest in History

Election Reform

Why 2020 US Presidential Race Will Be Costliest in History

WASHINGTON – In 1895, Mark Hanna, a U.S. senator from Ohio, explained how politics worked in his times: “There are two things that are important in politics,” he said. “The first is money, and I can’t remember what the second one is.”

Nearly 125 years later, things haven’t changed much.

In every two-year federal election cycle in the U.S., candidates and their supporters spend billions of dollars to raise their public profiles, get their messages out, and discredit their opponents.

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Article: Public Financing of Campaigns: Overview

Election Reform

Public Financing of Campaigns: Overview

During the 1907 State of the Union Address, President Theodore Roosevelt stated “The need for collecting large campaign funds would vanish if Congress provided an appropriation for the proper and legitimate expenses of each of the great national parties.” Public financing of elections, he believed, would ensure that no particular donor has an outsized influence on the outcome of any election, and would “work a substantial improvement in our system of conducting a campaign.”

Public financing of campaigns remains the least-used method of regulating money in elections, partly due to the result of the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Buckley v. Valeo. In that decision, the Court struck down a provision of the Federal Election Commission mandating public financing for presidential elections

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