Article: Middle District Of Georgia Election Officers Named, Election Fraud Complaint Phone Numbers Open

Election Fraud

Middle District Of Georgia Election Officers Named, Election Fraud Complaint Phone Numbers Open

Two Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the Middle District of Georgia have been named as election officers for the district, said Charlie Peeler, the U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Georgia.

Assistant U.S. Attorneys (AUSAs) Will Keyes and Todd Swanson will lead efforts in connection with the Justice Department’s nationwide Election Day Program for the November 3, 2020, general election. AUSAs Keyes and Swanson have been appointed to serve as the District Election Officers (DEOs) for the Middle District of Georgia, and in that capacity are responsible for overseeing the District’s handling of complaints of election fraud and voting rights concerns in consultation with Justice Department Headquarters in Washington.

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Article: Colorado election officials must verify a voter’s signature to count a ballot. Here’s how it works.

Election 2020, Election Reform

Colorado election officials must verify a voter’s signature to count a ballot. Here’s how it works.

For the 2020 election, Colorado voters statewide can correct ballots rejected for signature discrepancies through through their mobile phones.

Perhaps your signature is picture-perfect cursive letters. Or maybe it’s a messy scrawl. Either way, you may be wondering: How do Colorado election officials verify that the signature on your ballot envelope is actually yours?

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Article: Two of These Mail Ballot Signatures Are by the Same Person. Which Ones?

Election Reform

Two of These Mail Ballot Signatures Are by the Same Person. Which Ones?

More than half of states rely on signature matching to verify the identities of people who vote by mail. These states compare signatures they have on file (from voter registrations, ballot applications or the D.M.V.) with the ones voters put on their ballot envelopes.

But the practice is not implemented consistently across states, or even within them. The New York Times reached out to officials in every state that conducts matching to ask about their procedures. Most leave decisions to local officials or provide minimal instructions.

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